The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art, and Music Drive New York City (New Edition) Reviews

The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art, and Music Drive New York City (New Edition)

  • ISBN13: 9780691138749
  • Condition: New
  • Notes: BUY WITH CONFIDENCE, Over one million books sold! 98% Positive feedback. Compare our books, prices and service to the competition. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

Which is more important to New York City’s economy, the gleaming corporate office–or the grungy rock club that launches the best new bands? If you said “office,” think again. In The Warhol Economy, Elizabeth Currid argues that creative industries like fashion, art, and music drive the economy of New York as much as–if not more than–finance, real estate, and law. And these creative industries are fueled by the social life that whirls around the clubs, galleries, music venues, and fashion shows where creative people meet, network, exchange ideas, pass judgments, and set the trends that shape popular culture.

The implications of Currid’s argument are far-reaching, and not just for New York. Urban policymakers, she suggests, have not only seriously underestimated the importance of the cultural economy, but they have failed to recognize that it depends on a vibrant creative social scene. They haven’t understood, in other words, the social, cultural, and economic mix that Currid calls the Warhol economy.

With vivid first-person reporting about New York’s creative scene, Currid takes the reader into the city spaces where the social and economic lives of creativity merge. The book has fascinating original interviews with many of New York’s important creative figures, including fashion designers Zac Posen and Diane von Furstenberg, artists Ryan McGinness and Futura, and members of the band Clap Your Hands Say Yeah.

The economics of art and culture in New York and other cities has been greatly misunderstood and underrated. The Warhol Economy explains how the cultural economy works-and why it is vital to all great cities.

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3 Responses to “The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art, and Music Drive New York City (New Edition) Reviews”

  1. Neal Van Winkle Says:
    11 of 12 people found the following review helpful:
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Fuelled completely by shoes, April 7, 2008
    By 
    Neal Van Winkle (Chicago, IL) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Completely redundant in that she mentioned only a handful of New York City’s avante-garde. The book is interesting but limited in its discussion of the subject. Apparently she thinks that Charles and Ray Eames are brothers and that the MMA is now the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art. I wouldn’t waste your time, if I were you.

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  2. Pensive Bear "thefauve" Says:
    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Beginner’s Guide to the Manhattan Mindset, July 7, 2010

    If you’re at all a fan of New York City, especially when defined as a cultural mecca, then this is a must read for different reasons than those that The Warhol Economy advertises. An extensive, heady gossip column gone delightfully awry, The Warhol Economy is a book completely infatuated with the city’s culture and the industries lying behind it. Fellow New Yorkers and fans of the city and its artistic presence will not be disappointed, and even casual readers will get caught up in her name-dropping passion for the creative denizens of the Big Apple. However, if you’re a fan of the artist Andy Warhol, you’ll quickly see through the thin veil to realize the author is simply using the artist’s name to move copies off the shelves a little more quickly. Very little knowledge or new wisdom involving Warhol is imparted. There is intrinsic value in the above truths, however. First of all, the name Warhol is synonymous with both Pop Art and New York, and, he himself would consider the mention high praise, thinking the concept as being “very pop.” Secondly, while the author tends to ramble, loosely relating several familiar topics and famous people to the art and fashion scene of New York, through her chosen verbiage she inadvertently paints a very detailed portrait of the Manhattan collective groupthink. These thought processes are of great value in any timeframe, since as she even points out, “all business is done in New York.” Thirdly, such a move to associate her work with Warhol was smart for business, which is really the biggest, if not the only lesson being a resident of New York will teach you.

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  3. Jocelyn S. Chapman Says:
    2 of 18 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    one of the cool kids, September 10, 2007
    By 
    Jocelyn S. Chapman (Boston, MA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Huffingtonpost.com says it best! “Interviews with bold-faced names including designers Diane Von Furstenberg and Zac Posen, musicians The Talking Heads, and club owner of the legendary CBGB’s, Hilly Kristal, make The Warhol Economy an engaging cross between the academic and the gossipy-like an intellectualized Page Six of The New York Post.”

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